Since I started The Catcher in the Sand I use to mark the Jewish holidays with postings that relate one way or another with the occasion. I decided this time to mark Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year with a posting dedicated to the New Year meal. A joke says that Jews gather on holidays to commemorate the miseries of their past and eat for their remembrance. They may be some truth in the joke, although the New Year does not mark any painful moment in history, excepting the case you believe the Creation was such a moment :-)

I am starting early this year, there is one week left until Rosh Hashanah, but I am going on a vacation starting with tomorrow and I will not have time to deal with the blog, and I need to leave you time to do shopping, learn the recipes, maybe exercise.

 

source http://simple-english-blog.blogspot.co.il/2011/08/blog-post.html

source http://simple-english-blog.blogspot.co.il/2011/08/blog-post.html

 

Our Rosh Hashanah meal always starts with apples and honey for a sweet new year to come.

 

(video source JSpace Food)

 

Rosh Hashanah and Passover are probably the two big eating moments in the festive Jewish calendar. There are a number of shared dishes, but challah (bread for Shabat and other holidays) is certainly not one of them, as it is forbidden during the Passover week. So here is a recipe to prepare round challah.

 

(video source JJTV888)

 

On the other hand gefilte fish is the one dish that seems to work well on any Jewish holiday table.  I will not reveal the recipe of Liliana, this is a family secret even I do not know, but the one above may come second best.

 

(video source Joy Kosher)

 

What about a Warm Salmon Salad?

 

(video source joyofkosher)

 

Chicken and Apples seem a good combination for the the first meaty dish of the evening, combining poultry with the sweet flavors of the holiday. Here is the recipe.

 

(video source joyofkosher)

 

Serious meat eaters may have their treat with a treat of ribs.

 

Wine is part of the pleasure of the Jewish holiday meal. If you want to be on the traditional side and pick a kosher wine try to look at the list of the Top 50 Kosher Wines in the World.

 

(video source Allie’s Kitchen)

 

A honey cake seems to me the best way to end the meal. Here is one from Allie’s Kitchen.

 

I hope that those of you who will use the recipes will find those useful. Use them or not, have a great Rosh HaShanah meal and a great time together with your families.

Shanah Tova! A Happy New Year!